Protecting Our Health from Toxic Chemicals

Clean Water Action (CWA) and campaign partners are working on multiple fronts to create laws and policies that prevent harm to our health from toxic chemicals. Everyday we are exposed to harmful toxic chemicals that are linked to cancer, infertility, developmental delays and other health problems. CWA is a founding member of The Alliance for a Healthy Tomorrow (AHT).

Let's Ban Toxic Flame Retardants Together-Write to your Legislator

Please contact your state legislators now and ask them to support An Act to protect children, families, and firefighters from harmful fla

Protecting our Health from Toxic Chemicals

From before we are born until the time we die, every one of us is repeatedly and regularly exposed to toxic chemicals that can seriously harm our health. Clean Water Action is working to protect families and workers by phasing out harmful chemicals in our products.

Mind the Store

Clean Water Action has partnered with Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families on the Mind the Store Campaign, to urge the nation’s top ten retailers to g

From We All Live Downstream

Sperm photo - attributed to ScienceGenetics: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:06fertilizado.jpg
June 20, 2017

I waited until after Father’s Day to post this article because I didn’t want to rain on your “celebrating Dad” parade… but there’s something you should know: the sperm are in trouble.

MA Fallen Firefighters Memoral
April 19, 2017

On April 2nd, Massachusetts lost a great leader and champion of justice and environmental health, Senator Ken Donnelly.  Senator Donnelly was a firefighter of 37 years, former Secretary/Treasurer of the Professional Fire Fighters of Massachusetts and the Senator from Massachusetts’ Fourth Middlesex District since 2009. He died of brain cancer.

March 20, 2017

Many of the issues that environmental non-profits work on are problems that people of color (POC) face daily, but last year, as I attended a Clean Water Action staff retreat I looked around and noticed that the majority of the people there were white. I have a feeling that this is common in many environmental groups across the country. So why is it that POC, who are most impacted by environmental destruction, are not represented in the organizations that work to combat and address the harmful threats to their lives?