Clean Energy in Massachusetts

Massachusetts has a clean energy future. Clean Water Action is fighting climate change while working to bridge racial and economic gaps through creative, multi-stakeholder coalitions. Read on for more about our Massachusetts energy campaigns. 

Green Justice Coalition

Clean Water Action has served since 2008 on the Steering Committee of the Green Justice Coalition (GJC), a partnership between labor and grassroots justice groups across Massachusetts, convened by our good friends at Community Labor United.  Over the years, GJC has won a string of victories by growing the collective people power of community-based organizations, organized labor and environmental justice groups.

Massachusetts Power Forward

Massachusetts has emerged as a national leader on energy, making substantial progress in transitioning away from polluting sources of power to rene

New England Currents - Summer 2017

With Big Oil at the Helm in D.C.,
 New England States Push for Bold Climate Solutions Locally

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Solar panels, blue sky. Photo credit: epicurean / iStock

Clean Water Action Responds To Baker Administration Energy Access Strategies

Today, Clean Water Action responded to an announcement by Massachusetts Governor Baker, Environment Secretary Matthew Beaton and Department of Ener

From We All Live Downstream

Solar panels, sunset. Photo credit: vencavolrab / iStock
July 7, 2017

Solar energy is an incredible resource for Massachusetts, with approximately 15,000 jobs and 1600 megawatts of installations powering the Commonwealth's economy and clean energy future. This puts the Bay State in the top 10 for megawatts of solar installed across the nation—yes, dear Florida, we’re beaming right past you.

June 25, 2017

Photo caption: Clean Water Action staff and volunteers—from left, Lisa Bjerke, Kadineyse Ramize Peña, Joel Wool, Cee Byrd, Jennie Stephens, Terina Keller, Danny Faber, Elizabeth Saunders, Alex Papali

May 12, 2017

Massachusetts currently has two bills pending in the Legislature focused on putting a fair price on carbon pollution. Combined the bills have 79 co-sponsors — more than one-third of the Legislature. There is widespread support and strong momentum to pass a bill from previous years’ efforts .

In order to hear more directly from constituents, the Massachusetts State Senate is conducting a series of statewide forums in every corner of the state, known as Commonwealth Conversations.