Protecting the Chesapeake

Marylanders love their crabs, fish, and the Bay, but this way of life could disappear forever unless we follow through on our pollution reduction commitments. Clean Water is working to reduce agricultural pollution, address polluted runoff, and keep Maryland on track.

Power plant behind water spewing smoke. Photo credit: Martin Haas / Shutterstock

Power Plant Pollution Poisoning the Chesapeake Bay

Coal-burning power plants are poisoning the Chesapeake Bay with millions of harmful pollutants every year, including excessive nutrients that contribute to “dead zones” where crabs, oysters, fish and other aquatic life cannot survive.

 

General MD Baltimore Harbor. Credit HES Photography. Shutterstock

Local Victories From Around the State!

We’ve had a busy summer 2016 in Maryland! So much great work is being done to protect Maryland’s environment. Continue reading below to find out about some of our local victories from across the State.

Street drain, stormwater runoff. Photo credit: Abramov Timur / Shutterstock

Stormwater Pollution

Stormwater is the polluted runoff gathered from rain, severe thunderstorms, and even snow from roads, parking lots, and other impervious surfaces, where runoff collects pollutants and carries them downstream, ultimately into the Chesapeake Bay.

From We All Live Downstream

November 3, 2017

The days are now getting shorter, and while we’ve rolled back our clocks we will not roll back our water protections. Here’s what your Maryland Clean Water Action office has been up to as we fight federal rollbacks and push Maryland forward.

Maryland forest in late summer
November 3, 2017

Maryland is losing forests to development daily, but forests serve an important role in our ecosystem, and we cannot afford to lose them.

Forests have more value than just how their proximity increases property values. They're not just nice to look at; we cannot afford to chop down and fragment our remaining forests in an endless pursuit of new development. When we remove forests for houses and pavement, we create more problems with flooding, pollution, and climate change.

Just a few highlights:

October 19, 2017

In Frederick County, MD, there are several competing theories about the source of the name of the Monocacy River.  One is that it meant “muddy waters” in the language of the Native Americans who lived there.  That certainly makes sense when you look at it – in living memory, the Monocacy has been a muddy river, with severe sedementation problems that make the river run red and brown after a rainstorm.  But others say that Monnockkesey was the Shawnee name for the river: “river with many bends.”  That’s certainly true: the largest Maryland tributary to the Potomac, the river makes many curve