Virginia

Congressional Endorsements - Virginia

Opportunity for Clean Water Voters in Northern Virginia

Clean Water Action has endorsed John Foust in his bid for Northern Virginia’s 10th Congressional District seat vacancy, created by Rep. Frank Wolf’s retirement.

North Carolina Coal Ash Spill Flows to Virginia

Coal ash on the Dan River - Courtesy of Waterkeeper AllianceIn 2012, when Duke Energy’s Dan River coal-fired power plant in Eden, North Carolina was retired, many local residents may have thought that they were now free of the plant’s worst pollution. Unfortunately, plants of this type can leave a lasting pollution legacy, including coal ash waste which can remain toxic for decades. At the Dan River plant the coal ash was stored in an unlined pond on the edge of the Dan River.

In February 2014, a storm water pipe under the pond broke, draining toxic coal ash into the Dan River. By the time the pipe had been sealed a week later, 27 million gallons of slurry and 80,000 tons of coal ash had been dumped into the river, causing untold economic and environmental damage. The Dan River supplies drinking water to the town of Danville, just across the border in Virginia.

Protecting and Restoring the Chesapeake

In 1983, 1987 and 2000, Maryland Governors and their counterparts in Virginia, the District of Columbia and other jurisdictions in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed signed formal agreements that set timelines for cleaning up the Bay.  The most recent agreement called for deadlines that were to be met by 2010.  That deadline will not be met.

Chesapeake Currents - Fall 2014

Chesapeake Currents

Fall 2014 Edition 

Baltimore Officials Lead on Water

On September 9, while the U.S. House was voting 262-152 to block the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers from fixing the Clean Water Act so small streams and wetlands are once again protected, Baltimore took a strong stand for clean water. Baltimore City Council members voted unanimously for a resolution supporting EPA’s clean water rule.

The Council’s decisive action shows that these local officials, at least, understand that small streams and wetlands are “vital to the health of Baltimore’s drinking water,” says Clean Water Action’s Andy Galli. Once EPA’s proposal is finalized, 835 miles of streams and other surface waters flowing into the Baltimore area will benefit, along with “100 percent of Baltimore residents, who get at least some of their drinking water from sources affected by these streams,” Galli says. Read more 

Putting Drinking Water First: Alexandria, VA Supports EPA Efforts to Protect Streams and Wetlands

Alexandria – Mayor William D. Euille issued a proclamation on behalf of the City Council in support of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) and US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) proposal to clarify protection of streams and wetlands under the Clean Water Act. Clean Water Action applauds the Mayor for signing the proclamation and his continued leadership on environmental issues. View the resolution here.

“[We] support the proposed Definition of “Waters of the U.S.” Under the Clean Water Act and urge the Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers to finalize these important protections for our nation’s water resources,” said Mayor William D.

Published On: 
09/25/2014 - 12:43

Chesapeake Currents - Spring-Summer 2014

chesapeake currents
Spring/Summer 2014

Council's Science-Based Vote a Water Protection Landmark

Montgomery County’s Ten Mile Creek has been called the “last best creek.” It feeds the Little Seneca Reservoir which supplies emergency drinking water for more than 4.3 million DC area residents. The creek is at the center of a pristine and sensitive natural resource area in the northern part of the county and has long been threatened by short-sighted development proposals.

The Save Ten Mile Creek Coalition together with Clean Water Action scored a major victory this April, when the Montgomery County Council voted unanimously for responsible limits on  new development in area. The Council’s April 1 action thwarted developers’ latest plans, which would have paved over more than 150 acres. Read more

Canvass Director and Assistant Canvass Director Positions Now Available

Clean Water Action is the nation’s largest grassroots group focused on water, energy and environmental health.  Clean Water Action’s 1 million members participate in Clean Water Action’s programs for clean, water, prevention of health-threatening pollution, and creation of environmentally-safe jobs and businesses.  Clean Water Action’s nonpartisan campaigns empower people to make democracy work.

Make a Year End Gift for Clean Water in the Chesapeake Today!

Clean Water Art WorkWe need action now to secure a clean water future for everyone. I support the goal of fishable, swimmable, drinkable water for Maryland, Virginia, DC, and throughout the country.

Success on many of our top clean water priorities has never been closer - restoring protection for small streams and wetlands, controlling polluted runoff,
reducing toxic pollution that threatens our drinking water, and more - we just need you. This progress, and the positive momentum we're talking about didn’t happen automatically — it happened thanks to Clean Water Action members like you.

2013 Virginia State Legislative Endorsements

endorsements
You know how important water is to our economy, health and quality of life in the Commonwealth. That’s why this election is so critical. Tomorrow you need to be a clean water voter – find your polling location here and go vote!

You're not just deciding who your next Governor will be. You're choosing an Attorney General, Lieutenant Governor, and Delegate too. Those politicians are the ones who will make decisions about protecting water, health, and the environment on your behalf.  Voters like you will make the difference in all of those races. Make your voice heard on Tuesday, November 5th – and make sure your friends and family join you – we need to turnout as many voters like you as possible.

Chesapeake Currents | Late Summer 2013

chesapeake currents
late summer 2013 edition

Saving Montgomery County's Ten Mile Creek

Ten Mile Creek, the “last best creek,” is threatened by a proposed development in Clarksburg, in northwest Montgomery County. The proposed final and optional phase of a build-out in what was a rural area would be certain to degrade Ten Mile Creek’s water quality.

In addition to its status as a valuable natural area, the creek is a backup drinking water source for Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) customers, increasing the issue’s importance for most Montgomery and Prince George’s County residents.

Many citizens from already-developed parts of the Clarksburg area are raising their voices about how further development could harm their quality of life as well as the creek. Advocates have added their voices to the debate, as the proposed development would be the antithesis the “smarth growth” ideal of walkable urban places with nearby public transit. Instead, this development would cause needless natural resource degradation and increase dependence on long-distance travel.

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