Andrew Grinberg - Special Projects Manager

Trump's head

Trump’s FY 21 Budget: The worst budget for water. By the worst president ever

February 11, 2020

These cuts won’t just mean that EPA is doing less to protect our water, they also hit state and local governments and drinking water systems hard. States where Clean Water Action works would lose out on federal funding, leaving taxpayers and ratepayers holding the bag. 

Oil and water. Credit Andrew Grinberg

The Water Impacts of CO2-EOR

January 30, 2020

To stave off the worst effects of the climate crisis, the global and U.S. economies need to decarbonize as fast as possible. Capturing carbon emissions from industrial sources and pulling carbon out of the air via direct air capture are technologies we will likely need in our toolbox if we are to achieve net zero or negative greenhouse gas emissions.

Trump's Dirty Water Rule

Trump’s Dirty Water Rule: Another Gift to Oil and Gas

January 23, 2020

The Trump administration finalized its signature Clean Water Act rollback, the Dirty Water Rule. This extreme interpretation of our bedrock water quality law rolls back the clock to a time when corporate polluters could dump toxic waste into rivers and streams and pave over wetlands without seeking a permit.

Belridge oil field. Credit Sarah Craig

The Dirty Water Rule would mean more oil and gas wastewater in rivers and streams.

March 28, 2019

New analysis finds big impacts in oil producing states

EPA is Studying Oil and Gas Wastewater

October 15, 2018

Last week EPA held a public meeting in DC to share updates and take public comment on the agency’s study of oil and gas wastewater, also known as produced water. The oil and gas industry has grown significantly in water constrained states around the country, like Texas and New Mexico, and has a long history of putting drinking water sources at risk, from California to Pennsylvania.

Pipes. Credit: Sarah Craig, Faces of Fracking

Limit oil production. Protect California’s water.

March 8, 2018

California’s efforts to address climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions have earned it a reputation as a climate leader. Most of the state’s actions, however, have focused on the “demand-side” of carbon emissions: reducing energy consumption, increasing efficiency, using cleaner fuels and energy sources, and reducing vehicle miles traveled. However, as the country’s 5th largest oil producer (recently falling from 3rd), the state has never done enough to keep polluting fossil fuels from being produced in the first place.

Race Track Hill site

200 Keystone Spills

November 17, 2017

On Thursday, news broke of a spill from the Keystone pipeline. The 5,000 barrels (210,000 gallons) of toxic tar sands oil that was discharged into South Dakota grasslands was the largest spill on the Keystone to date. But every day, the oil industry intentionally discharges far greater volumes of toxic wastewater in the environment, and nobody seems to notice.

EOR Schematic

CO2-EOR is not a cleaner form of oil drilling.

November 14, 2017

While CCUS may eventually prove to be a viable strategy for addressing climate change, using captured carbon to increase the production of oil and gas undermines the climate mitigation goals of carbon capture and storage. At the same time, CO2-EOR presents risks to groundwater, the environment, and the health of communities living near oil fields. As a known threat to drinking water sources, enhanced oil recovery is regulated by the federal Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Underground Injection Control (UIC) program.

Back to 1985?

Scott Pruitt says he cares about clean water. The budget he’s pushing says otherwise.

June 16, 2017

EPA is already underfunded, suffering from years of budget cuts despite its crucial role in protecting all of us. Further reducing EPA’s budget would severely limit its ability to protect our water, air and climate. The proposal calls for slashing grants to states to carry out their environmental and health protection programs.

Water doesn't protect itself. Image: shutterstock

Dear EPA: We need to strengthen water protections, not erase them.

May 2, 2017

Yesterday, EPA’s Office of Water held a listening session on what Scott Pruitt and Donald Trump call, “the regulatory burden.” We call it public protections for our air, water, and health. I had the opportunity to testify. My comments are below. If you want to weigh in, you can take action here, and be sure to personalize the message you send.