The Clean Water Blog

We All Live Downstream

Madison Park student on field trip to MLK shoreline
March 8, 2019

Imagine growing up in a low-income immigrant of color neighborhood that has been subject to disinvestment and neglect. Imagine your neighborhood is also near neighborhoods with extensive wealth and resources and demographics that are nothing like yours. If you grow up in this type of neighborhood you may start thinking that you are not worth being invested in,  and that your circumstances say something about your value as a person.

March 6, 2019

Yesterday, the Senate Finance Committee held a public hearing on SB548: legislation to take trash incineration out of Maryland's Renewable Portfolio Standard and stop giving it subsidies intended to support the development of wind, solar, and other renewable forms of energy. With a team of Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County residents, we spoke out about the air quality, health, and climate impacts of trash incineration, and the reality of zero waste alternatives like composting, recycling, and source reduction.

March 5, 2019

In some California basins, sustainable groundwater management can mean the difference between whether a species goes extinct or a community’s drinking water becomes contaminated. The stakes are high.

Stop the dirty water rule!
February 28, 2019

This week advocates and activists are in Kansas City, Kansas for the one and only public hearing the Environmental Protection Agency scheduled for it's scheme to strip protections from millions of miles of streams and more than half the wetlands across the nation. Clean Water Action was there as well. This is my testimony to EPA about the Dirty Water Rule. You can watch my testimony here (video courtesy of our friends NWF Water)

Speak out for clean water
February 27, 2019

I’m in Kansas City this week, and it’s not just for BBQ and jazz and the Negro League Baseball Museum (though those are nice perks). I’m here because the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)is holding the only public hearing on its scheme to strip Clean Water Act protections from millions of miles of streams and more than half of the nation’s wetlands.

Ct Youth Advocates
February 27, 2019

Students and young people all over the world are standing up to address many significant problems facing our society—and making a big difference!  We’re doing the same by launching a club at our school called “Choate for Clean Water.” As juniors in high-school, we became concerned about clean drinking water through our passion of politics and environmental studies. Our club’s focus is to raise awareness and educate within our community about the importance of clean water and how policies at the state and federal level impact our water.

February 25, 2019

Everyone has a right to safe and affordable drinking water. Clean water is one of Minnesota’s most precious resources, and it’s time that we act like it.

Nearly 75% of Minnesotans gets their drinking water from groundwater. With almost 10,000 public water sources coming together to supply drinking water, we need robust protections in place to ensure the health and safety of all of our communities. That’s where Wellhead Protection Plans come in. A Wellhead Protection Plan is a strategy designed to protect public drinking water supplies.

Hartford skyline and Connecticut River. Photo credit: Sean Pavone / iStock
February 25, 2019

CT Member Survey Results

February 25, 2019

In 2017, after years of work in coalition and thousands of grassroots comments from Marylanders like you, Maryland became the second state in the nation to pass a law limiting the use of antibiotics being fed to healthy animals.

February 22, 2019

For the past two years, Frederick and Carroll Counties have been debating the Monocacy Plan: an advisory document meant to guide both counties on improving the health of their shared Monocacy River. But between 2017 and 2018, drastic changes were made to the Plan that gutted its value for protecting and improving the Monocacy's water quality and environmental health. We're urging the Frederick County Council to reject the 2018 Monocacy Plan - a position the Frederick County Planning Commission just unanimously agreed upon, as well.