Waste

Clean Water is  taking-on single use products. From shopping bags, to food and beverage packaging, to plastic water bottles, our goal is to minimize the use of single use products.  We engage businesses, local governments, and individual consumers in rethinking the disposable lifestyle.

Microplastics_Rhode Island. Photo Credit Oregon State University

Rhode Island Trash Trawl - Solving the Problem of Microplastics

This summer, we are conducting a “trash trawl” in the bay to look for microplastics lurking in our own backyard in Narragansett Bay from July 18-22. The goal is to figure out how much microplastic pollution there is in the bay, where the most plastic can be found, and ultimately, what we can do to stop it from entering our waters to begin with. Follow along with us on Facebook, Twitter and Social Media using using #narragansettbay #trashtrawl. 

Recent Actions

Take the Pledge to Reduce Single-Use today!

Pledge to reduce your reliance on single-use disposable products and packaging.

Press Releases

Make “House Call” on South Carolina Company Spending the Most To Overturn Environmental Protections, Persist with Plastic Pollution

January 31, 2013

Community leaders and environmental advocates marked the beginning of a 30- day countdown to implementation of Austin’s Single-Use Bag Ordinance by announcing a “Bag to the Future” concert and party, scheduled for February 28th, the day before the new law goes into effect.

Waste Blog Posts

Waste_Plastic_National_Pile. Photo: Mikadun / Shutterstock
August 4, 2017

As we learned in July, the world is awash in plastic trash. We've produced more than 9 billion tons of plastic since the middle of the 20th century and most of it lingers in landfills and recycling piles, in our oceans, on our beaches, and in our bodies. It's not going anywhere anytime soon.  It's our toxic legacy.

August 2, 2017

Catch up on the Plastic Free July news from Berkeley...

July 25, 2017

The BRESCO trash incinerator is the largest air polluter in Baltimore, wastes what could be a valuable resource for local businesses using zero waste practices, and connects with a system of steam pipes that put residents and visitors of Baltimore at risk.  In May, the City Council passed a groundbreaking resolution committing the city to zero waste g