Abigail Pearse

Green infrastructure projects like this rain garden in East Baltimore hold rainwater in place until it can soak into the ground and reduce the total volume of water entering the storm drain system. Photo by Jennifer Kunze.

Reducing Stormwater Runoff in the Chesapeake Bay

August 8, 2016

Stormwater runoff is one of the leading contributors to pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. After big storms, the water carries whatever is on the ground and in the streets into our waterways. Impervious surfaces, such as the roads and pavement that cover densely populated areas, don’t allow rain to seep into the ground, causing more polluted stormwater to enter the Bay.

Debris in Maryland Photo by Jennifer Kunze

Flash flood shows need for better stormwater restoration plans

August 3, 2016

On Saturday, July 30th, a flash flood devastated Ellicott City. Approximately six inches of rain fell in two hours, which carried away over 100 vehicles and caused millions of dollars of damage to the City’s roads, sidewalks, and buildings. Not only was there severe destruction of infrastructure, but the storm also killed two people who were swept away by the water.

Sinkhole in Baltimore. Photo by Abigail Pearse

Last week’s downtown sinkhole shows need for infrastructure investment

July 15, 2016

On Monday, July 4th, a sinkhole formed on West Mulberry Street in Baltimore City. Located between Greene and Paca Streets, this sinkhole will block traffic on Mulberry street for weeks and has already caused transportation officials to close a ramp off of U.S. Route 40 that led to downtown Baltimore. Not only is this sinkhole an inconvenience for traffic, but it is also unsafe. An inspector from the Department of Public Works (DPW) was injured as he examined the sinkhole when the ground collapsed under him, which widened the sinkhole.