Toxic Chemicals

From before we are born until the time we die, we are repeatedly and regularly exposed to toxic chemicals with the potential to seriously harm our health. Toxic chemicals can be found in our homes, schools and workplaces – in products we use on a daily basis. We're fighting at local, state, and federal levels to fix our chemical laws and find safer alternatives to the chemicals in everyday products.

Flowers

Join the Pollinator Protection Squad!

Three years ago, we were part of a coalition to ban consumer pesticides containing bee-killing neonicotinoids (neonics) in Maryland. This law went into effect on January 1, 2018.

Recent Actions

Let's Ban Toxic Flame Retardants Together-Write to your Legislator

Please contact your state legislators now and ask them to protect our health from toxic chemicals.

Expand PFAS Monitoring to Protect Californians

PFAS are a family of approximately 4700 human-made chemicals that are incredibly effective at combating oil fires as well as repelling grease, water, and stains.

Toxic Chemicals Blog Posts

MA_Paper receipts_canva
May 24, 2019

T.J.Maxx is a popular shopping destination for many Bostonians because it offers a wide variety of products at often discounted prices. It is almost like a routine for me to pick up some vegan snacks at the Allston T.J.Maxx on weekends. Every time I go shopping, I have the habit of collecting receipts to keep track of my spending. But last week, when I went to TJ Maxx to buy my favorite blueberry protein bars, I suddenly found myself unsure what to do when the cashier handed me the receipt. You may wonder why.

nonstick pan with an egg in it
April 10, 2019

They’re in stain resistant carpets and clothing, cookware, some cosmetics, outdoor gear, and even dental floss. You may know them as Teflon®, or Scotchguard®. You have them in your body and they’ve been detected in 455 California drinking water sources thus far. I’m talking about a class of fluorinated chemicals, called PFAS, and they threaten California’s water and its people. Why haven’t we done more about them?