Putting Drinking Water First in Minnesota

Putting Drinking Water First: Clean Water Action believes that everyone has a right to safe and affordable drinking water. We are making drinking water impacts a primary consideration when developing regulations and other programs involving upstream activities that can impact downstream drinking water sources.

  • Water Infrastructure Investments: Dangerously outdated infrastructure remains a huge threat to our lakes, rivers, streams and drinking water quality. From combined sewer overflows to old lead service lines, our water infrastructure needs to be updated to protect water resources for future generations.
  • Tracking Contaminants of Emerging Concern:  People and industry use tens of thousands of chemicals. A vast array of these chemicals has been found in the environment, where we consider them contaminants of emerging concern or CECs. Most of these CECs have not been fully evaluated for the risks they might pose to the environment— or to our health.
  • Reducing Lead Exposure- Lead is a highly poisonous metal and can affect almost every organ in the body and the nervous system. The wide spread contamination of drinking water in Flint, MI, has also raised many concerns about lead in our drinking water and in public places such as schools. We are working to enact policies that will reduce our exposure to lead and make Minnesota Lead Free.
  • Reducing Salt in our Water: In winter, salt is applied to roads and walkways to melt ice and snow — this is where most of the chloride in our water comes from. The salt dissolves, runs into storm drains, and most storm drains go directly into local waterways.
  • Protecting Groundwater: Nearly 75% of Minnesotans get their drinking water from groundwater sources. To protect groundwater the legislature passed the Groundwater Protection Act in 1989.
historic map of the Great Lakes

The Great Lakes Compact and The Dangers of Water Diversions from the Lakes

The Great Lakes contain 20% of the earth’s fresh surface water — to protect this resource for future generations, we must take care and man

Girl drinking water, photo: Aqua Mechanical

PFC Contamination in Minnesota

The Minnesota Department of Health recently lowered PFC drinking water guidance levels. What you need to know about PFC drinking water contamination.

Zebra mussels

Aquatic Invasive Species / Invasive (Asian) Carp

Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) come in a variety of forms from invasive (Asian) carp to zebra mussels to viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS). AIS describes non-native species that have the potential to invade, become established, and harm the ecology of Minnesota’s waters.

From We All Live Downstream

February 25, 2019

Everyone has a right to safe and affordable drinking water. Clean water is one of Minnesota’s most precious resources, and it’s time that we act like it.

Nearly 75% of Minnesotans gets their drinking water from groundwater. With almost 10,000 public water sources coming together to supply drinking water, we need robust protections in place to ensure the health and safety of all of our communities. That’s where Wellhead Protection Plans come in. A Wellhead Protection Plan is a strategy designed to protect public drinking water supplies.