stormwater

CB38-2019 Protect This Watershed

August 23, 2019

Howard County has a lot of upcoming legislation with hearings scheduled in September. This includes CB38-2019, the Protect This Watershed bill.

Councilwoman Liz Walsh's CB38-2019 is a very big bill that is responding to the problem of waivers in the Patapsco Lower North Branch Watershed. Many laws involving the environment include waivers at the discretion of the overseeing agency, mainly to provide needed flexibility in unforeseen circumstances. When waivers become routine practice, they undermine the effectiveness of that legislation. 

Kate and Otto Triggiano

Introducing Kate Triggiano, our new Rethink Disposable Coordinator!

July 19, 2017

Hello! My name is Kate Triggiano and I am the new Rethink Disposable Coordinator for Clean Water Action's ReThink Disposable program in New Jersey! Rethink Disposable's goal is to minimize the use of single use products: from shopping bags and food and beverage packaging, to plastic straws and water bottles. ReThink Disposable assists businesses by helping them reduce their dependency on single use disposables, while saving money through lower waste collection and supply costs.

Pollution_Water_National_Two_Pipes_Discharging_Wastewater.jpg

Virginia’s Last Major Source of Untreated Sewage Dumping

January 11, 2017

The City of Alexandria is dumping raw sewage into our waterways - and has been for more than 40 years. Alexandria is not only putting public health at risk, it is also breaking state and federal law. This uncontrolled toxic dumping is not only health hazard to city residents and visitors, but also multiple downstream communities, and undermines the rights of Virginians to drinkable, swimmable, and fishable water.

Green infrastructure projects like this rain garden in East Baltimore hold rainwater in place until it can soak into the ground and reduce the total volume of water entering the storm drain system. Photo by Jennifer Kunze.

Reducing Stormwater Runoff in the Chesapeake Bay

August 8, 2016

Stormwater runoff is one of the leading contributors to pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. After big storms, the water carries whatever is on the ground and in the streets into our waterways. Impervious surfaces, such as the roads and pavement that cover densely populated areas, don’t allow rain to seep into the ground, causing more polluted stormwater to enter the Bay.

Baltimore's stormwater remediation fee could be funding green stormwater restoration projects like this rain garden in McElderry Park. Photo by Jennifer Kunze.

City Council calls for Transparency and Accountability in Stormwater Project Funding

June 10, 2016

Last night, the Baltimore City Council held a public hearing on two ordinances that would provide transparency and accountability for how funds being collected from Baltimore City residents intended to be used for stormwater infrastructure improvements and environmental restoration are being spent. Check out the bills for yourself:

photo: keantian / Shutterstock

Pittsburgh - The Next Kansas City?

March 4, 2016

Here in Southwestern Pennsylvania, our region is finally taking a new approach to address our sewage overflow problem.

The new direction is a faster, smarter, and cheaper solution. It echoes the calls that our members have been making all along – invest first in green infrastructure.

West Warwick Flood in 2010. Courtesy Weather.gov

It is time to start talking about our hidden infrastructure (and unhiding some if it, too)

March 3, 2016

For the last few months, all anyone has been able to talk about here in Rhode Island is infrastructure.